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Tag Archives: iPad

Millions of people are listening to digital  music via sites like Spotify and Pandor. These sites have strong followings for a number of reasons one of which being  the concept of  “passive discovery” or the ability to  stumble on new content based on artist or genre searches.

Amsterdam-based startup, Shuffler.fm is putting a new spin on that discovery process by aggregating music directly from blogs like Pitchfork, TheMusic.FM, and Stereogum in their  The service  allows listeners to play continuous mixes by genre..  In addition, music blogs can create their own dedicated pages that include a “play this blog” button.

While this may be nothing ground-breaking in the space,  Shuffle.fm’s slick new tablet interface offers users a great way to discover new artists (and music blogs for that matter) with some contextual relevance.  At the very least, it’s a refreshing change from the algorithm-based model we’ve become accustomed to thus far.

Shuffler.fm is currently available in the iTunes store and their pitch from SXSW’11 can be viewed here

Ever since purchasing my iPad I’ve been on a hunt for a journal app that allows me to express my creative side.  I’m not shy about my love for visual note taking from sources like OgilvyNotes and new iOS app, Clibe looks like a great way for me to take a stab at it.   The application allows users to keep visual journals integrating text, brush-strokes and images via your library, iPad camera or Facebook account and place them right in the journal, doctor and manipulate them.

In addition, Clibe takes things a step further by allowing people to publish their journals in private mode or for all the world to see via their journal gallery.

The app is still in its infancy so give them a chance but I think the concept of social-journaling is a pretty interesting one.  It’s prompted me to go out and buy my first tablet pen to get the most of the experience.

Check out the site at:  http://www.myclibe.com

New startup Booktracks launched today.  Their goal –  to transform the reading experience  through the addition of soundtracks and music.  Essentially what the technology does is add a movie-like experience through synchronized sound effects and background music immersing the reader into the story.  For example, you may be reading Bright Lights Big City and enter into a McInerny’esque party and hear noise at the Odeon with some subtle 80’s music playing in the background..  Some titles are already available via the Booktrack Bookshelf and on iTunes.

As reported in an article by BBC News, a company called Cooliris  has developed two technologies that enable ad creators to transform 2D images into 3D.

“When you look at a photo of the Grand Canyon on a screen, you can’t peek around it and see what it’s like on the other side – simply put, photos have a fixed perspective,” explained Mayank Mehta, head of products at Cooliris.

“We are able to represent 3D objects on a 2D device by drawing out all the different angles from the scene. As viewers change perspectives using gestures on their mobile device, we show them the corresponding image. This makes it feel like they are at the Grand Canyon,”

Despite gang buster sales in the tablet space, the iPad has always been criticized in one area; its viewing capabilities in direct sunlight. Devices like the Kindle are easier to read because they use E_Ink, a proprietary type of electronic paper that was developed at the MIT Media Lab. The technology which is used most commonly on e-readers, mobile phones and watches takes  electronic material and  processes it into a film.

Apple  may be working on a solution to rectify the issue. The company  showed interest in the technology  this week in a new patent application filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The filing, entitled “Systems and Methods for Switching Between an Electronic Paper Display and a Video Display,” describes hardware that can selectively switch between the two types of screens.  Basically it would allow users to dynamically switch all or just part of color  screen to black and white E-ink or static images.


Via Business Insider